Tourism Harrison Newsletter

Sasquatch Days 2015

Sasquatch Days 2015

 

 

 

We hope you will join us on the 27th and 28th of June as the joint hosts for Sasquatch  Days,   Sts’ailes First Nations and the Village of Harrison Hot Springs, invite visitors to this unique event that brings two communities together in an opportunity to learn about the traditions of the Sts’ailes people and share cultural experiences.

North of Highway 7, running along the west side of the Harrison River, lays the village of Sts'ailes, whose traditional territory includes Harrison Hot Springs and Harrison Lake and includes the watersheds of Harrison Lake and River, Chehalis River and the Fraser River. The name Sts'ailes, meaning the Beating Heart, comes from halfway up the west side of Harrison Lake. In this area, Xals, the Transformer, battled a once-powerful shaman called the Doctor and turned him to stone.

In an effort to preserve and limit him, Xals broke apart pieces of his body and spread them throughout the territory, creating landmarks. Where his heart landed became known as the village of Sts'ailes. The usual English name Chehalis is identical to that of the much more numerous Chehalis people of southern Puget Sound in Washington. By Sts'ailes tradition, the southern Chehalis were separated from their homeland as a consequence of the Great Flood. Fish and seashell fossils found in abundance near Mystery Creek (cited as one of the meeting places of Sasquatch)  deep in Sts'ailes territory, seems to support this Native American Hypothesis. Culture in Sts'ailes runs very strong. They take great pride in what they do and how they carry themselves particularly through their ceremonies and in their spirituality. They "live" the culture.

This intercultural celebration includes canoe races, traditional salmon barbeque, medicine walks, cultural boat tours, arts & craft activities, games, entertainment and most importantly talks on the Sasquatch from Sts’ailes experts and local Harrison Hot Springs Sasquatch investigators.

This two-day event will begin at 9:30 am Saturday June 27th with a short procession from the Memorial Hall to Harrison Lake Plaza where a welcoming ceremony will be held at 10:00.  Each day will feature artisan activity tables, medicine walks and opportunities for intercultural sharing.  Saturday morning the main event starts as war canoes gather for a friendly competition that will continue with final races on Sunday.  Of course, no canoe race is complete without a traditional salmon barbeque that  will take  place Saturday and Sunday afternoon.

Keep your eyes peeled for Sasquatch...there's nothing they like better than Salmon and Bannock!

 

Mother's Day Menu

Harrison Hot Springs Mother's Day Menu

 

 

 

 

 

Shoreline Tours - 604-796-3123 | A 2 hour boat cruise with “breathtaking scenery, waterfalls and amazing natural rock formations are all part of the Harrison Lake Tour...”

Harrison Resort & Spa - 604-796-224 | The Hot Springs Spa that Heals All Health and Wellness Emerges from within at Harrison Hot Springs Resort & Spa. Using the mineral springs as a source of inspiration and energy, our Healing Springs Spa features a menu of stress-relieving, immune-system-boosting, energy-building and rebalancing treatments that open your eyes to the true bliss that comes from feeling alive and well.

Ramada Spa Treatments or Romance Packages - 604-796-5555 | "Our mission is to take care of you, our guest, to listen to you, to nurture you, relax and to help you look and feel your best whilst using the finest natural and organic ingredients possible."

The Pretty Estate Resort - 604-796-1000 | Sandpiper - Sandpiper is heralded as one of British Columbia’s best resort courses, is renowned for its adventure packages, and, is consecutively, voted by the province as the #1 golf course in the Fraser Valley. Rowena's Inn on the River - Time stands still from the moment you catch your breathe. Secluded on a 160-acre waterfront estate, Rowena's Inn on the River is a grand, English-style manor that was converted into a boutique. Special Occasion Brunches - We are known for our Special Occasion Buffet Brunches! Mother's Day brunch, served between 10am and 2pm.

BC Sport Fishing Group - 604-796-3345 | Sturgeon fishing holidays in BC offer one of the most popular guided sport fishing experiences that can be found anywhere.  Sturgeon fishing on the Fraser River and Harrison River provide calm water sport fishing year round.

Biking on Country Roads | Harrison Hot Springs offers some of the finest biking to be found in the Fraser Valley. At Harrison's doorstep the fertile farmland of Agassiz provides kilometer of beautiful scenery and wonderful country roads. Best of all it is all flat. Check out the maps on our website or stop into the information center for a Circle Farm Tour Map.

Our Pet Sasquatch

Harrison Hot Springs is an eco-friendly destination that opens up BC’s backyard to every age group and level of ability. Incorporated in 1949, Harrison Hot Springs has a total land area of 5.57 square kilometers (and half of that is vertical, not horizontal.)  The Village is located at the south end of Harrison Lake, 123 km east of Vancouver.  The population in 2011 was 1468 and then some people moved out, some moved in, some were born and some showed up in 2012 and didn’t leave and some come here every day but sleep and vote elsewhere.  Anyway, we stopped counting because it just got difficult.
We Love!! animals.  According to village dog registration records there are only three dogs that live here… the other 892 just come to visit on a daily basis.  There are quite a few cats based on how many cats come through my cat door to eat at my house even though I rarely see the same cat twice.  The only time my personal cat population goes down is when a raccoon comes in and leaves it’s scent on the walls and doors… then we don’t have cats for a couple of days.  And FYI, yes, a seventy-three pound raccoon can fit through a cat door designed for dwarf cats.


All of the Village residents have a shared pet.  He is a Sasquatch.  No, he is not a collective hallucination.  Look at it this way …if our water can sustain 10 – 14 foot sturgeon that we don’t often see, and our mountains can sustain bear, deer and cougar even though we almost never see them, why can’t our forests sustain a large hairy person?  Just because you can’t see him, doesn’t mean we can’t.  (Mushrooms anyone?)
We are an incredibly friendly and social people and because we are really nice, we all leave town on beautiful summer days in order to free up parking for the tourists.    If you happen to see more than 10 people in a group, they are not a gang…that is a parade…so don’t forget to clap and cheer and maybe you’ll get some candy thrown your way!

Keeping Ernie's Spirits Up...

THE SPIRIT TRAIL

Winter wind storms cause havoc in forested areas that walkers and hikers rarely see and the windfall silently and slowly decomposes to feed the soil and nurture new growth.  The Spirit trail in Harrison Hot Springs, over the years has been subject to a number of significant winds and the trail, guarded by the spirits, was becoming hazardous. Tourism Harrison saw the potential to save this trail, that  is so well loved by visitors and residents alike. So they hired Scott Tree Care Service to come in and assist in the project by determining which trees were potential problems and taking down any  that would pose a hazard,  leaving them in the forest to decompose.   Some local groups then volunteered to come in and clean up the trail, clearing any little branches and raking the pathways.

    

The Artist

Ernie Eaves became involved in the ceramic arts soon after his retirement as a high school shop and theatre teacher four years ago.  He has a small studio in his garage in which he throws pots (sometimes against the wall), sculpts and tries to figure out how to glaze stuff.


The Artists story

The Spirit Trail began as a walk in the woods with Pearl the Wonder-Dog.  We discovered a seemingly abandoned trail that meanders through a wonderfully mysterious bit of old second growth forest in which the processes of renewal are seen everywhere.  In the spring and early summer, the false Lily-of-the-valley covers the forest floor in shiny green and year by year the moss envelopes the wind-fallen trees, seemingly giving them a second life.

It is an enchanting place to walk, and as time passed the trees seemed to me to be alive in an other-worldly sort of way.  As a lark, I created a dozen ceramic faces and surreptitiously hung them in the trees, hoping to cause a laugh or two among other walkers who might discover the trail.  The compulsion was on me and the dozen eventually became over thirty. 

At the turn around point of the trail, there is a circle of trees, a sort of committee of spirits.  I made a dozen ceramic faces of women from different places and circumstances and I call them the “Goddesses”.  They are meant to evoke the quiet but monumental strength of women from all over the world.  Most have their eyes closed to impart a quiet, meditative feeling to the spot.  The whole endeavor grew of it’s own accord, without a plan or even a particular goal in mind.  The first masks were put in the trees over six years ago, and apart from knowledge of its whereabouts by the Geo-caching community (People who use GPS units to find stuff) and a brief mention in British Columbia Magazine, little effort has been made to publicize their existence.  Instead, it has been a kind of “Guerrilla art”, meant to be a surprise and mildly subversive.

Visitor's Guide