Tourism Harrison Newsletter

Victoria Day...it's Here!

It’s here!!!
Summer in BC starts with the May long weekend and everyone goes camping.  Since the days of spontaneously packing up the old canvas tent and a cooler full of food, packing the six kids in the back seat of the old woody, throwing the 100 pound canoe on top of the roof and stuffing in one change of clothes per person, camping has evolved!
Nobody needed reservations.  Nobody needed maps.  Nobody needed to send out a cyber message that would bring 300 close friends running to meet you out in the woods.

Four ways to go camping;

The “realistic” Camper www.discovercamping.ca
Under the heading of pick your Provincial park or campground choose Sasquatch.
You will then be given options for the three sites within Sasquatch Park…Hick’s lake, Bench Campground  or Lakeside.

  • FCFS –( first come, first served) remember, check out is 11am
  • All campsites in Sasquatch Park allow wood fires.
  • No shower facility, pit toilets only.

The “civilized” Camper:


Need we say more.  Harrison offers some great RV sites check our listing

The Redneck Camper:

The term Redneck has become widely used as a "badge of honor" for those camping in the more remote areas of our region.    For camping up the East or West side of Harrison lake visit: http://www.sitesandtrailsbc.ca/default.aspx

  • Click on find a site by Location
  • Click on Chilliwack
  • Scroll to East Harrison or West Harrison.

Remember that west Harrison is accessed from Harrison Mills and not through the Village of Harrison.  Your turn off point for West Harrison or the Chehalis forest Service Road is Highway 7 and Morris Valley road. For the East Side of Harrison Lake access is through the Village of Harrison Hot Springs and up Rockwell Drive.

These are remote areas and not for the unexperienced camper.  Make sure you have enough fuel, a working spare tire and the means with which to change it.  Water and food.  Blankets (there is a fair amount of elevation gain the further up lake you go and this can put you into some fairly cold areas.)  Make sure that someone at home knows where you have gone and when to expect you back.  There is little to no cell phone service and if you break down or need medical assistance you will need to send someone out before help can come in.  Only use a 4x4 vehicle or a car you really don’t like.  


And here’s a tip…if you have to send someone out (at least 2 hours) and then wait for the ambulance (at least 2 hours), make sure that the person going to get help knows which side of the lake you are on.  There aren’t enough ambulances to send one up each side trying to hunt you down on a road where road signs do not exist and directions rely on landmarks as in “When you see the flipped over blue truck, turn.”

The “I want to be spontaneous and use a tent” Camper
Unless you have reservations somewhere, leave the tent at home.  Finding tenting sites is difficult at the best of times…on hot long weekends…torture.

mt. cheam...definately do-able!

                                                 

The Village of Harrison Hot Springs lies near the northern foot Mt. Cheam.  Rising 2104 meters, this peak dominates our landscape and offers not only a breathtaking backdrop but a hiking challenge as well.  Can you do it??  Yes, you can.

https://www.google.ca/maps/@49.1690625,-121.6217038,8985m/data=!3m1!1e3
Cheam Peak was part of the oral history of the Sto:lo peoples. The Halkomelem name for the peak, Theeth-uhl-kay, means "the source" or "the place from which the waters spring."
Cheam dominates the eastern Fraser Valley, rising above Bridal Falls and Agassiz just east of Chilliwack. It and three sister peaks form a group known as the Four Sisters or Four Brothers, which are part of the mountain wall framing the Lower Fraser Valley.
Though the trail to the summit lies along the southwestern flank of the mountain, the view from the top to the north offers an unprecedented look at Harrison Lake.
Lady Peak is a mountain located just southeast of Cheam Peak and has an elevation of 2200 meters.  It is west of the four peaks in the eastern portion of the range known as The Lucky Four Group.  Lady Peak can be summited by a route that branches off the Cheam Peak Trail.
The Lucky Four Group is the name for a group of four mountains in the Cheam Range of the North Cascades. The name of the region comes from the abandoned Lucky Four Mine near Foley Peak and refers to the four summits in the eastern end of the range that are visible from the old mine access road that runs near Wahleach (Jones) Lake.
The mountains in this group, from north to south, are: Foley Peak, Welch Peak, Stewart Peak and Knight Peak.

Hiking Mt. Cheam is something that should be on everyone's bucket list.   Check out how to get up there at this great Club Tred website;

http://www.clubtread.com/Routes/Route.aspx?Route=73

Rather Fly?  Try Hang Gliding Mt. Cheam:

http://www.westcoastsoaringclub.com/sites/bridal_falls_lower.php

Harrison Family fun Carnival

Harrison Family fun Carnival
Feb 8 & 9, 2014

We've added something new and we are really, really excited about it.  Bring the family out for a couple of days worth of wonderful, family fun from 11am until 4pm each day...stay connected to our website where we will be posting event schedules soon! 
The Harrison Family Fun Carnival is two days of activities, games, entertainment and fun for the entire family.   It takes place February 8 & 9 as Harrison Hot Springs celebrates the new Family Day long weekend.  The Harrison Family Fun Carnival takes place at two venues. Sport activities will be taking place at St. Alice Hall while crafts and entertainment will be taking place at Memorial Hall.   The Sasquatch Scavenger Hunt will take in a number of wonderful stops through the Village and includes a wonderful family friendly hike.  The hunt will run rain or shine so don't forget your rain boots and umbrellas!

Activities include:


Memorial Hall
• Magician - Erik Stephany
• Story Telling
• One Woman Circus - Sand Northrup
• Button making table
• Drum making table
• Face painting
• Sasquatch Investigators
• Sasquatch Scavenger Hunt

 


St. Alice Hall
• 40 foot inflatable obstacle course
• Mini golf course
• Little Kickers indoor soccer
• Pirate bouncy castle
• Junior inflatable sport centre

Sand Northrup - One Woman Circus, is an exceptional artist and educator whose extensive experience and contagious enthusiasm for circus arts inspires thousands. Well known for her hilarious, interactive performances, Sand's skill as physical comedian, juggler and unicyclist matches her remarkable ability to build rapport with young audiences in French, English or both.

Erik Stephany – Well known not only for his incredible Magic but also for his comic characters such as Chicken Kung Fu, Professor Zaravin  and Dr. Smarticals and his amazing talent  for balloon animals.   In Erik’s words, “Magic doesn't just belong on a stage.”  Erik Stephany is a master of close-up magic with huge impact!

The Eagles are here...but so are the Sturgeon!

The Eagles are here... but so are the Sturgeon

 

 

 


If you’re out here checking out the thousands of Bald Eagles that are flocking to the Harrison area, keep in mind that the mighty Fraser River, a main artery of millions of migrating salmon that pass through on the way to the spawning grounds, is as well, home to the long-lived white sturgeon, the largest fresh water fish in North America. These monster fish grow to over one thousand pounds and can live nearly 200 years. They are considered to be one of the most spectacular fresh water sports fish, having the reputation for their size, strength, and impressive jumps.

All guided sturgeon fishing trips with BC Sports Fishing Group, one of our local fishing companies, include the sampling, tagging, and releasing of all white sturgeon caught as per their ongoing commitment to the Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society.

To date BC Sport Fishing Group has tagged over 40 % of the more than 46,000 Sturgeon that have been tagged for the Fraser River Sturgeon Conservation Society.

One of the oldest families of fish in existence, sturgeon are native to subtropical, temperate and sub-Arctic rivers, lakes and coastlines of Eurasia and North America. They are distinctive for their elongated bodies, lack of scales, and occasional great size: sturgeons ranging from 7–12 feet (2-3½ m) in length are common, and some species grow up to 18 feet (5.5 m). Most sturgeons are bottom-feeders, spawning upstream and feeding in river deltas and estuaries. While some are entirely freshwater, a very few venture into the open ocean beyond near coastal areas.

Several species of sturgeons are harvested for their roe, which is made into caviar — a luxury food which makes some sturgeons pound for pound the most valuable of all harvested fish.  Because of their long reproductive cycles, long migrations, and sensitivity to environmental conditions, many species are under severe threat from overfishing, poaching, water pollution and damming of rivers.  Over 85% of sturgeon species are classified as at risk of extinction, making them more critically endangered than any other group of species.

Several measures have recently been taken to improve the White Sturgeon’s prospects for survival.
In 1994, commercial and sport harvest of sturgeon became illegal in the province, and First Nations people voluntarily stopped their sustenance harvests. This should allow more fish to reach reproductive age, and may help to rebuild some stocks. Designation of the White Sturgeon by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (cosewic) as a Vulnerable species in Canada has focused attention on its plight and stimulated some long-needed research.

Here are the facts if you are ever lucky enough to be in a place that offers sturgeon on the menu:

Nutrition Facts
Sturgeon, cooked
Amount Per 100 grams
Calories 135
% Daily Value*
Total Fat   5 g   7%
Saturated fat   1.2 g   6%
Polyunsaturated fat  0.9 g
Monounsaturated fat  2.5 g
Cholesterol   77 mg   25%
Sodium   69 mg   2%
Potassium   364 mg   10%
Total Carbohydrate  0 g   0%
Dietary fiber   0 g   0%
Sugar 0 g
Protein 21 g   42%
Vitamin A  17%
Vitamin C  0%
Calcium   1%
Iron     4%
Vitamin D  128%
Vitamin B-6  10%
Vitamin B-12  41%
Magnesium  11%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Before 1800, swim bladders of sturgeon (primarily Beluga sturgeon from Russia) were used as a source of isinglass, a form of collagen used historically for the clarification of beer, as a predecessor for gelatin, and to preserve parchments.

Visitor's Guide