Tourism Harrison Newsletter

Festival of the Arts Concert Series

Every year for the last 35 years, thousands of people have been able to say, "Oh my God, it was amazing!"  Have you been one of them?  Do NOT let this year's concert series go by without your attendance...world class entertainment and small town atmosphere meet here in Harrison Hot Springs to create a music festival like no other...see you there!

Straight from the Valley...
The Festival kicks off with a sampling of the Valley's finest performing artists.
UFV Bhangra Club
UFV Bhangra Club is the official team of the University of the Fraser Valley.  It was founded by students of the university in the Fall of 2010 to preserve the art and culture of Bhangra, a South Asian genre that has become hugely popular in the Fraser Valley in the past decade
Langley Ukulele Ensemble
In the more than 30 years of its existence, The Langley Ukelele Ensemble has become one of Western Canada’s most distinctive and accomplished youth musical organizations, playing arrangements of pop, classical and folk music with precision, dexterity and a sense of fun. 
The Sabir Sisters
The Sabir Sisters (Shamma, Roxanna, Sarah and Laila) are individually and collectively among BC's most well-known fiddlers.  Combining step-dancing, influenced in equal parts by Ottawa Valley style and tap, with classic Canadian fiddling and strong singing, The Sabirs are Fraser Valley treasures.   

 
Kobo Town...
Artistic voices of the Caribbean diaspora and one of the grooviest calypso bands anywhere.  Founded by Trinidadian-Canadian songwriter Drew Gonsalves, Kobo Town is named after the historic neighborhood in Port-of-Spain where calypso was born.  Kobo Town takes the intricate wordplay of classic Caribbean music and runs it through a 21st Century filter.


Eric Bibb...
The best there is in acoustic blues, an Eric Bibb performance is an enriching experience, both musically and spiritually.  A native New Yorker, who has spent most of his life in Europe, Eric is the son of Leon Bibb, nephew of John Lewis of the Modern Jazz Quartet, and godson of Paul Robeson.

Literary Café ...An evening of readings and music courtesy of UFV students and faculty.
Theatre...Two one act plays from the 2014 University of the Fraser Valley Theatre Directors’ Festival.


Ross Ainslie & Jarlath Henderson... Award-winning contemporary pipers unite and reinvent the traditional sounds of Ireland & Scotland.  Individually they’re two of the best players around but collectively they create a chemistry which is almost magic.  They are not only vastly talented but have created a sound that is bursting with emotion and energy - a fusion of pipes and flutes which pushes the boundaries of what the instruments can achieve.

Mokoomba...A distinct blend of traditional Tonga music and the vibrant youthful energy of southern Africa.  Exuberant youthful energy bursting with natural talent and contagious rhythm, the six young men of Mokoomba represent Zimbabwe’s next generation of hope.  Musically distinct, Mokoomba combines traditional and modern instruments with a rich blend of rhythms, creating a vibrant sound consisting of traditional Tonga music yet embracing the sounds of southern Africa’s diverse cultures.


Quique Escamilla...Quique is a multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and producer living in Toronto.  With his stylistically flexible band, he fuses traditional Mexican musical styles such as Ranchera and Huapango with modern sounds of rock, reggae, pop, ska, cumbia, bolero and other Latin American rhythms.

Nathan Music Co...Part country, part wild Gypsy music and part rootsy pop. All homemade in the prairies.
Nathan Music Co. (formerly Nathan) has been at the forefront of alternative country music in Canada since the early 2000's.


Riccardo Tesi & Banditaliana...
A fresh and sunny kaleidoscope of Tuscan sounds, Mediterranean flavours and jazz improvisation.  Banditaliana was founded by internationally renowned composer and concertina player Riccardo Tesi, rated as one of the most daring and authoritative musicians on the European world music scene.

For tickets, call 604-796-3664, order on-line at www.harrisonfestival.com

2014 Festival of the Arts

Saturday July 12th through Sunday July 20th

Everyone always has so many wonderful things to say about the amazing concerts and art markets of the Festival of the Arts. 

here's a little something you may not know about
Warm breezes, cold water, hot sun, sandy beach, the coconut scent of sunblock, happy people

and then it gets even better...incredible live music!

for as little as $2.00 per day

The Harrison Festival of the Arts Music on the Beach

Here's who's going to be entertaining you while you work on your tan;

 

We're waiting for you!!

For Festival information and tickets:

harrisonfestival.com 

604.796.3664

Sasquatch!

 

SASQUATCH DAYS

JUNE 7 - 8

 

The Coast Salish traditional way of life, like all Native Indian tribes, displays a fine and fulfilling balance between man, woman, and the natural and supernatural worlds.
The spiritual beliefs are critical to understanding Coast Salish art. Belief in guardian spirits and transmutation between human and animal were widely shared between tribes in many different forms. One can see this belief expressed in First Nations art. The symbology, form, and function of ceremonial clothing and head dresses were all designed to communicate the spiritual and historic traditions from one   generation to the next.

After checking out the masks pictured to the left, take a look at the depictions of what the ancestors of early man most probably looked like and their similarities to the aboriginal spiritual being who is known to have been around for almost 10,000 years

Australopithecus afarensis 3.6 million years ago
Some Australopithecus afarensis left human-like footprints on volcanic ash in Laetoli, Kenya (Northern Tanzania) which provides strong evidence of full-time bipedalism. Australopithecus afarensis lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. A. afarensis also had a relatively small brain size (~380–430 cm³).


3.5 Million years ago - Kenyanthropus platyops, a possible ancestor of Homo, emerges from the Australopithecus genus.
3 Million years ago - The bipedal Australopithecines evolve in the savannas of Africa. Loss of body hair takes place over the period of 3-2 Million years ago, in parallel with the development of full bipedalism.

2.5 Million years ago - Appearance of Homo. Homo habilis is thought to be the ancestor of the lankier and more sophisticated Homo ergaster. Lived side by side with Homo erectus until at least 1.44 million years ago, making it highly unlikely that Homo erectus directly evolved out of Homo habilis.

Homo erectus – 1.8 million years ago
Homo erectus evolves in Africa. Homo erectus would bear a striking resemblance to modern humans, but had a brain about 74 percent of the size of modern man.

 

1.2 Million years ago -Homo antecessor may be a common ancestor of humans and Neanderthals.

Homo heidelbergensis – 600 thousand years ago
It is morphologically very similar to Homo erectus but Homo heidelbergensis had a larger brain-case, about 93% the size of that of Homo sapiens. The holotype of the species was tall and more muscular than modern humans.

 

Y-chromosomal Adam lived in Africa approximately 338,000 years ago.  He is the most recent common ancestor from whom all male human Y chromosomes are descended.

Homo sapiens – 200 Thousand years ago in Ethiopia.

Hot Springs Harry - 2 years ago...just sayin'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Ernie's Spirits Up...

THE SPIRIT TRAIL

Winter wind storms cause havoc in forested areas that walkers and hikers rarely see and the windfall silently and slowly decomposes to feed the soil and nurture new growth.  The Spirit trail in Harrison Hot Springs, over the years has been subject to a number of significant winds and the trail, guarded by the spirits, was becoming hazardous. Tourism Harrison saw the potential to save this trail, that  is so well loved by visitors and residents alike. So they hired Scott Tree Care Service to come in and assist in the project by determining which trees were potential problems and taking down any  that would pose a hazard,  leaving them in the forest to decompose.   Some local groups then volunteered to come in and clean up the trail, clearing any little branches and raking the pathways.

    

The Artist

Ernie Eaves became involved in the ceramic arts soon after his retirement as a high school shop and theatre teacher four years ago.  He has a small studio in his garage in which he throws pots (sometimes against the wall), sculpts and tries to figure out how to glaze stuff.


The Artists story

The Spirit Trail began as a walk in the woods with Pearl the Wonder-Dog.  We discovered a seemingly abandoned trail that meanders through a wonderfully mysterious bit of old second growth forest in which the processes of renewal are seen everywhere.  In the spring and early summer, the false Lily-of-the-valley covers the forest floor in shiny green and year by year the moss envelopes the wind-fallen trees, seemingly giving them a second life.

It is an enchanting place to walk, and as time passed the trees seemed to me to be alive in an other-worldly sort of way.  As a lark, I created a dozen ceramic faces and surreptitiously hung them in the trees, hoping to cause a laugh or two among other walkers who might discover the trail.  The compulsion was on me and the dozen eventually became over thirty. 

At the turn around point of the trail, there is a circle of trees, a sort of committee of spirits.  I made a dozen ceramic faces of women from different places and circumstances and I call them the “Goddesses”.  They are meant to evoke the quiet but monumental strength of women from all over the world.  Most have their eyes closed to impart a quiet, meditative feeling to the spot.  The whole endeavor grew of it’s own accord, without a plan or even a particular goal in mind.  The first masks were put in the trees over six years ago, and apart from knowledge of its whereabouts by the Geo-caching community (People who use GPS units to find stuff) and a brief mention in British Columbia Magazine, little effort has been made to publicize their existence.  Instead, it has been a kind of “Guerrilla art”, meant to be a surprise and mildly subversive.

Visitor's Guide