We're not just a beach, we are a beach!

We're not just a beach... we ARE a beach!

 

 

 

 

From shoreline picnic grounds, to the public boat launch,  sandy beaches with a kids play park and public washrooms,  the float plane dock where people in their teens prefer to lounge, and the water sport dock that offers everything from kayak rentals to speed boat rentals, leisurely boat tours to the magnificent Rainbow Falls,  a truly “sick” floating water park perfect for teens and adults…guided fishing tours for salmon and sturgeon, guided eco tours featuring our local wild life, seals popping up to check out the action and Bald Eagles and Great Blue Heron soaring above.

Wheelchair accessible pathways make simply walking the beach front easy and peaceful.
Southerly winds in the afternoon make windsurfing and kiting here a truly breath taking experience.
Water skiing, wakeboarding, sea-doo-ing, blaster bumper boats, banana tube rides… if you can’t find something to do in Harrison it’s because you haven’t visited the beach or the watersports dock on the lake at the front of the Harrison Resort and Spa.

If your idea of water sports means actively and "relax-ively" watching the water and other people sporting upon it while you enjoy the warm summer breeze and exceptional food, drink and dessert, you couldn't ask for better places to do this than local restaurant patios that look out over the beach!

Slow food cycle tour 2013 - agassiz

Slow Food Cycle Tour 2013 - Agassiz

 

 

 

 

This summer, join us in the Fraser Valley for two family-friendly Slow Food Cycle Tours. Agassiz’s 7th annual Cycle Tour Agassiz will be held on Saturday, July 27th and Chilliwack’s 5th Cycle Tour will be held on Sunday July 30th.  It’s going to be a wonderfully s-l-o-w weekend!

Online Registration is now open!  Our cycle tours are increasingly popular so we encourage you to pre-register.  Participation will be limited to 1000 cyclists per tour to ensure the farmers are not overwhelmed and you and your friends and family have a quality experience.

The leisurely self-guided Slow Food Cycle Tours provide an educational and culinary experience exploring many farms; some that are open to the public for this day only!  The tours give a rare chance to meet the farmers and learn about agriculture in the spectacular Fraser Valley.

Support the Slow Food movement and our local Fraser Valley farmers.  Agassiz and Chilliwack will feature farms that are unique to their areas, so be sure to sign up for both cycle tours and spend the weekend at one of the comfortable Valley accommodations.  Each Cycle Tour is around 23km (give or take) and relatively flat.  And best of all, kids and youth 18 and under cycle for free.  There will be some free samples along the way and others will charge for food.  Be prepared to enjoy both!

To register visit www.slowfoodvancouver.com

Agassiz Tour Date: Saturday, July 27th, 2013. (Rain or shine)
Time: 9am - 4pm (arrive and leave at your leisure!)
Start location:  Registration is located at the Agassiz fairgrounds, 6660 Pioneer Avenue, Agassiz.

Spend the weekend! Enjoy great accommodations and romantic getaways in the area, from the Harrison Hot Springs Resort, to nearby Provincial and private campgrounds, to cozy bed-and-breakfasts.

A shopping shuttle service has been provided by Tourism Harrison and Limbert Mountain Farm. They collect your purchases from the farms and bring them back to the registration area for you to pick up.

Chilliwack Tour Date: Sunday July 28, 2013 (rain or shine)
Time: 9am - 4pm (arrive and leave at your leisure!)
Start Location:  Registration is located at the Tourism Chilliwack Visitor Centre, located off of Exit #116, in front of Heritage Park (the big red building) at 44150 Luckakuck Way.  Come early for breakfast (not included in cycling fee).

Cost:   Agassiz only - $15/person | Chilliwack only - $15/person

Harrison Festival of the Arts

Harrison Festival of the Arts

 

 

 

 

 

July 6-14 2013

“Celebrating the cultural diversity of Canada and the world, by presenting audiences with the artistic expression of diverse cultures, helping them appreciate the contributions of different cultures to our common culture.”

An explosion of color and sound, a sensory feast, a smile that reaches round the globe…for thirty-five years The Harrison Festival of the Arts has been bringing the world of art and music to our doorstep and has given hundreds of thousands of people the opportunity to experience worlds of sound otherwise not accessible to most.

“The Society’s commitment to its audience is to bring the best Canada and the world has to offer, while remaining accessible and inclusive.”

Phyllis (Executive Director) and Ed (General Manager) Stenson along with (over the years) a cast of thousands, have spent 31 and 26 year respectively, bringing The Festival of the Arts to Harrison Hot Springs.  Under their leadership, The Festival has grown to become a nationally recognized event and they have recently announced that after this year’s event, they will officially begin their retirement and Andy Hillhouse and Mel Dunster will be stepping up to the plate to begin organizing for Festival 2014.
Evenings in the Hall – Experience the magic of live performance in the venerable Harrison Memorial Hall.  Enjoy eight full length concerts, one evening of theatre and one evening of literary readings.

Music on the Beach – Enjoy musical from around the world at this outdoor stage with the mountains and majestic Harrison Lake as a backdrop.

Art Exhibit – The Festival’s visual art exhibit takes place at the picturesque Ranger Station Art Gallery.

Workshops – Join in participatory workshops lead by Festival performers.

Juried Art Market – July 6 – 7 and July 12, 13 & 14 – Under the tents on the grass in front of the beach.  A juried market with some of BC’s finest artists and artisans, featuring a dazzling array of hand crafted items.

Children’s Day – Wednesday, July 10 – A special day for the young and young at heart.
http://www.harrisonfestival.com/

 

Sasquatch Days 2013

Sasquatch Days 2013

 

 

 

Only one month away!  Sasquatch Days 2013 will be held on June 8th and 9th on the beach front here in beautiful Harrison Hot Springs.

This cultural event is a collaboration between the Village of Harrison Hot Springs and the local First Nations Band of the Sts’ailes and includes War Canoe Races, Men’s, Women’s, Mixed Doubles, Buckskins, Small and Large Canoes.  There will be a salmon barbeque, Drumming, Artisans, Sasquatch Talks, Medicine walks, Games and Cedar Weaving.

Ever wonder what the difference was between War Canoes and Dragon Boats?
Dragonboats are the basis of the team paddling sport of dragon boat racing an amateur watersport which has its roots in an ancient folk ritual of contending villagers held over the past 2000 years throughout southern China. While ‘competition’ has taken place annually for more than 20 centuries as part of religious ceremonies and folk customs, dragon boat racing has emerged in modern times as an international sport, beginning in Hong Kong in 1976.
Typically, a war canoe will be faster than a dragon boat over any given distance, because of a better hull shape (narrower and without the characteristic ‘w’ shape of dragon boat hulls), lighter construction, and the kneeling position allowing for a fuller, more powerful stroke than the sitting position used in dragon boats.

The term ‘war canoe’ is derived from large Native American canoes intended for war, and war canoeing was in fact a popular sport in Vancouver,  before large gatherings of indigenous people were outlawed for a time beginning in 1922.  War canoeing among indigenous communities is enjoying a revival today, although there as yet has been little interaction with non-indigenous teams.

A war canoe holds 15 paddlers including one coxswain, or cox, for steering. Native Americans also utilized canoes in warfare, ranging from small, lightweight canoes for rapid raids to large, ceremonial canoes amply decorated for conferences and other events. As an attack craft, a canoe is actually quite well designed, because it can be easy to maneuver with a skilled crew, and it can be extremely fast with a lot of paddlers working together to propel the canoe. Native American war canoes are sometimes seen at ceremonial events held by groups with a tradition of canoe building

Visitor's Guide