Green Point Picnic Ground

Green Point Picnic Ground

 

 

 

 

Thousands of years ago, a huge blanket of ice covered everything in sight except the highest mountain peaks. As the ice mass slowly receded, it bulldozed tones of earth and rock lying in its path, carving out a lakebed. As the earth warmed and the glaciers melted, these scooped out trenches filled with water creating Harrison Lake.

The lake is tidal. Ocean tides influence water levels in the Fraser River, the Harrison River and even Harrison Lake. As far back as 8000 years ago, local Stolo people have harvested trees here for use in building enormous long houses, dugout canoes and carvings.

From 1931 to 1937, Green Point was used as a base camp by the Green Point logging company. Massive trestles were built and steam locomotives were used to access the wilderness for further tree harvesting. Remnants of these trestles still exist today near the entrance to Sasquatch Provincial Park, less than a kilometer away. The modern road network in Sasquatch Park follows much of the original logging rail network.

In the autumn months, migrating salmon fill the waters at Green Point and Eagles and seals follow.Wildlife abounds from squirrels and rabbits to deer and brown bear, although they are keenly sensitive to human activity and make themselves scarce during the times the park is in use.

Only a five-kilometer drive from the four-way stop in Harrison Village, the park is beautifully maintained and offers a boat launch, a large parking area, washroom facilities and picnic tables. The beach is a mixture of sand and pebbles and is a wonderful place to explore and a child's paradise filled with nature's wonders.

 

Visitor's Guide