Our Pet Sasquatch

Harrison Hot Springs is an eco-friendly destination that opens up BC’s backyard to every age group and level of ability. Incorporated in 1949, Harrison Hot Springs has a total land area of 5.57 square kilometers (and half of that is vertical, not horizontal.)  The Village is located at the south end of Harrison Lake, 123 km east of Vancouver.  The population in 2011 was 1468 and then some people moved out, some moved in, some were born and some showed up in 2012 and didn’t leave and some come here every day but sleep and vote elsewhere.  Anyway, we stopped counting because it just got difficult.
We Love!! animals.  According to village dog registration records there are only three dogs that live here… the other 892 just come to visit on a daily basis.  There are quite a few cats based on how many cats come through my cat door to eat at my house even though I rarely see the same cat twice.  The only time my personal cat population goes down is when a raccoon comes in and leaves it’s scent on the walls and doors… then we don’t have cats for a couple of days.  And FYI, yes, a seventy-three pound raccoon can fit through a cat door designed for dwarf cats.


All of the Village residents have a shared pet.  He is a Sasquatch.  No, he is not a collective hallucination.  Look at it this way …if our water can sustain 10 – 14 foot sturgeon that we don’t often see, and our mountains can sustain bear, deer and cougar even though we almost never see them, why can’t our forests sustain a large hairy person?  Just because you can’t see him, doesn’t mean we can’t.  (Mushrooms anyone?)
We are an incredibly friendly and social people and because we are really nice, we all leave town on beautiful summer days in order to free up parking for the tourists.    If you happen to see more than 10 people in a group, they are not a gang…that is a parade…so don’t forget to clap and cheer and maybe you’ll get some candy thrown your way!

Harrison Oktoberfest 2014

EIN PROSIT:
At every great party that involves alcohol, certain songs will be sung that will create a group-memory-sound-track guaranteed to instantly transport you and your friends back to whatever you were eating, wearing, drinking, doing or wish-you-hadn’t-been-doing                      .
Turn that “Party” into a “Beer Fest” with the Oompah band blasting out “Ein Prosit” every 20 minutes or so and the song unites the Beer Fest Lovers around the world.  Seriously, where else can you find lots of men in leather shorts all happily yelling out good cheer?  It is an unashamed group collaboration that helps everyone get “nice and lubricated”. 

Ein Prosit has only been sung in its modern version since 1957.   It really isn’t a salute to genius lyric talent.  The composers of the modern version, Gerhard Jussenhoven and Kurt Elliot were most likely good and drunk when they came up with the words.  In German there are a total of 8 different words.  It’s a little more complicated in English as there are 12 words to memorize (including words such as “a” and “to”).   Ultimately, the song is a mutation of a much older version, so Gerhard and Kurt were not really challenged with creating a song so much as making sure that the excuse to chug your beer continued into the twenty-first century in an organized fashion.  

Whenever Ein Prosit is played, you are obliged to:

stand up with your beer held high, sway along to the tune, toast with everyone at the table and chug  your   mug.  At festivals the song is often followed by a charge of “Schenkt ein, trinkt aus, schenkt ein, trinkt aus!”(I poured you one, drink it up, I poured you one, drink it up!).
An alternative closing phrase from the band leader is "Prost ihr Säcke!" (Cheers, you p&%$s!), to which the crowd replies in unison "Prost du Sack!" (Cheers, you p&%$s!).


German Lyrics to Ein Prosit

Ein Prosit, ein Prosit
Der Gemütlichkeit
Ein Prosit, ein Prosit
Der Gemütlichkeit.
OANS ZWOA DREI! G'SUFFA!

English Lyrics to Ein Prosit
A toast, a toast
To cheer and good times
A toast, a toast
To cheer and good times.
                                                                                           ONE TWO THREE! DRINK UP!

Top 10 Oktoberfest songs 
• 1. Ein Prosit
• 2. Skandal im Sperrbezirk
• 3. Bayern, des samma mir
• 4. Marmor, Stein und Eisen Bricht
• 5. Viva Colonia
• 6. Country Roads (Seriously???)
• 7. Fürstenfeld
• 8. Joana du geile Sau
• 9. So ein Schöner Tag (Fliegerlied)
• 10. Hände zum Himmel

Popular Oktoberfest songs in English
• I will survive
• Hey baby!
• YMCA
• Mambo Number 5
• Living Next Door to Alice
• Sweet Home Alabama

Sasquatch!

 

SASQUATCH DAYS

JUNE 7 - 8

 

The Coast Salish traditional way of life, like all Native Indian tribes, displays a fine and fulfilling balance between man, woman, and the natural and supernatural worlds.
The spiritual beliefs are critical to understanding Coast Salish art. Belief in guardian spirits and transmutation between human and animal were widely shared between tribes in many different forms. One can see this belief expressed in First Nations art. The symbology, form, and function of ceremonial clothing and head dresses were all designed to communicate the spiritual and historic traditions from one   generation to the next.

After checking out the masks pictured to the left, take a look at the depictions of what the ancestors of early man most probably looked like and their similarities to the aboriginal spiritual being who is known to have been around for almost 10,000 years

Australopithecus afarensis 3.6 million years ago
Some Australopithecus afarensis left human-like footprints on volcanic ash in Laetoli, Kenya (Northern Tanzania) which provides strong evidence of full-time bipedalism. Australopithecus afarensis lived between 3.9 and 2.9 million years ago. A. afarensis also had a relatively small brain size (~380–430 cm³).


3.5 Million years ago - Kenyanthropus platyops, a possible ancestor of Homo, emerges from the Australopithecus genus.
3 Million years ago - The bipedal Australopithecines evolve in the savannas of Africa. Loss of body hair takes place over the period of 3-2 Million years ago, in parallel with the development of full bipedalism.

2.5 Million years ago - Appearance of Homo. Homo habilis is thought to be the ancestor of the lankier and more sophisticated Homo ergaster. Lived side by side with Homo erectus until at least 1.44 million years ago, making it highly unlikely that Homo erectus directly evolved out of Homo habilis.

Homo erectus – 1.8 million years ago
Homo erectus evolves in Africa. Homo erectus would bear a striking resemblance to modern humans, but had a brain about 74 percent of the size of modern man.

 

1.2 Million years ago -Homo antecessor may be a common ancestor of humans and Neanderthals.

Homo heidelbergensis – 600 thousand years ago
It is morphologically very similar to Homo erectus but Homo heidelbergensis had a larger brain-case, about 93% the size of that of Homo sapiens. The holotype of the species was tall and more muscular than modern humans.

 

Y-chromosomal Adam lived in Africa approximately 338,000 years ago.  He is the most recent common ancestor from whom all male human Y chromosomes are descended.

Homo sapiens – 200 Thousand years ago in Ethiopia.

Hot Springs Harry - 2 years ago...just sayin'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Ernie's Spirits Up...

THE SPIRIT TRAIL

Winter wind storms cause havoc in forested areas that walkers and hikers rarely see and the windfall silently and slowly decomposes to feed the soil and nurture new growth.  The Spirit trail in Harrison Hot Springs, over the years has been subject to a number of significant winds and the trail, guarded by the spirits, was becoming hazardous. Tourism Harrison saw the potential to save this trail, that  is so well loved by visitors and residents alike. So they hired Scott Tree Care Service to come in and assist in the project by determining which trees were potential problems and taking down any  that would pose a hazard,  leaving them in the forest to decompose.   Some local groups then volunteered to come in and clean up the trail, clearing any little branches and raking the pathways.

    

The Artist

Ernie Eaves became involved in the ceramic arts soon after his retirement as a high school shop and theatre teacher four years ago.  He has a small studio in his garage in which he throws pots (sometimes against the wall), sculpts and tries to figure out how to glaze stuff.


The Artists story

The Spirit Trail began as a walk in the woods with Pearl the Wonder-Dog.  We discovered a seemingly abandoned trail that meanders through a wonderfully mysterious bit of old second growth forest in which the processes of renewal are seen everywhere.  In the spring and early summer, the false Lily-of-the-valley covers the forest floor in shiny green and year by year the moss envelopes the wind-fallen trees, seemingly giving them a second life.

It is an enchanting place to walk, and as time passed the trees seemed to me to be alive in an other-worldly sort of way.  As a lark, I created a dozen ceramic faces and surreptitiously hung them in the trees, hoping to cause a laugh or two among other walkers who might discover the trail.  The compulsion was on me and the dozen eventually became over thirty. 

At the turn around point of the trail, there is a circle of trees, a sort of committee of spirits.  I made a dozen ceramic faces of women from different places and circumstances and I call them the “Goddesses”.  They are meant to evoke the quiet but monumental strength of women from all over the world.  Most have their eyes closed to impart a quiet, meditative feeling to the spot.  The whole endeavor grew of it’s own accord, without a plan or even a particular goal in mind.  The first masks were put in the trees over six years ago, and apart from knowledge of its whereabouts by the Geo-caching community (People who use GPS units to find stuff) and a brief mention in British Columbia Magazine, little effort has been made to publicize their existence.  Instead, it has been a kind of “Guerrilla art”, meant to be a surprise and mildly subversive.

Visitor's Guide